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A man pushes against police at a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters
Turbulent Thailand

In pictures: How Thailand's protests unfolded on the streets

From government decree to tear gas, the situation deteriorated quickly

Nikkei staff writers | Thailand

Hours after a royal motorcade carrying Thailand's Queen Suthida and Prince Dipangkorn Rasmijoti was surrounded by protesters, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha declared a state of severe emergency early Thursday morning, banning large-scale gatherings and restricting the media from publishing information that could affect national security or peace and order.

Protesters have since defied the assembly ban and taken to the streets. Student leaders have been detained, and water cannons, tear gas and waterborne irritants have been deployed by police.

Below are photographs of how events evolved:

King Maha Vajiralongkorn, left, and Queen Suthida travel in the royal motorcade toward the Grand Palace in Bangkok on Oct. 14.   © Reuters

 

A police water cannon truck drives along a road flanked by riot police during a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 15.   © Reuters

 

A woman reacts as protesters gather to demand the government's resignation and the release of detained leaders in Bangkok on Oct. 15.   © Reuters

 

A protester gives the three-finger salute at a demonstration in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

Human rights lawyer Arnon Nampa speaks during a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 14. He has since been detained.   © Reuters

 

A skateboarder rolls over an image of Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha during a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 14.   © Reuters

 

A demonstrator gives the three-finger salute during a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 14.   © Reuters

 

A man walks in the middle of the street during a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

A man gestures and shouts as people scuffle with police at a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

A detained protester looks out from a prison vehicle in Bangkok on Oct. 15.   © Reuters

 

Roses adorn a demonstrator's helmet at a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 14.   © Reuters

 

A man gives the three-finger salute during an Oct. 15 gathering in Bangkok of protesters demanding that the government resign and release detained leaders.   © Reuters

 

People scuffle with police at a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

Police officers hold up their riot shields in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

Police officers in riot gear line up in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

Police officers close the road near Bangkok's Ratchaprasong junction on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

 

A police officer behind a riot shield at a protest in Bangkok on Oct. 16.   © Reuters

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