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Unification Church and politics

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Unification Church followers hold a rally in downtown Seoul on Aug. 18, protesting negative Japanese media coverage of their religion after the suspect in the assassination of former Japanese Prime Minster Shinzo Abe blamed the church for his family's financial troubles.   © AP

SEOUL -- On Aug. 18, more than 1,000 women sat down in rows in front of Gwanghwamun, the main gate of Gyeongbokgung Palace in central Seoul. They were members of the Unification Church.

"We appeal to the world to pay attention to an issue of religious oppression," a Japanese woman said, reading a letter of protest on the stage. The protesters then marched through some of Seoul's main streets.

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