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In possibly his last big diplomatic move before retiring, Pakistan's army chief, Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, presented Washington with a vision for relations "much like the Americans' understanding with South Korea."   © Nikkei montage/Source photo by Getty Images
Asia Insight

Pakistan's top gun seeks U.S.-China balance before retirement

Gen. Bajwa's diplomatic ambitions clash with domestic political tensions

WAJAHAT S. KHAN, Nikkei staff writer | Pakistan

NEW YORK -- With the clock ticking on his expected retirement, Pakistan's all-powerful army chief, Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, paid a long-delayed visit to Washington in early October. Some saw it as a valedictory trip. Others speculated that it was a signal he intends to stay on after his term ends next month, just as he secured an extension in 2019.

Either way, Bajwa's mission was clear: shoring up a crucial diplomatic relationship undermined by years of distrust, at a time when Islamabad faces an unprecedented storm of challenges, including political turmoil inflamed last Friday by the disqualification of former Prime Minister Imran Khan from holding public office.

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