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Caixin

China's epidemic-inspired wildlife ban has had big economic costs

Legal watchdog report says rules have affected the jobs of 250,000 people

New rules forbid the sale and consumption of species both from the wild and bred in captivity, including snakes, porcupines and bamboo rats. (Photo by Caixin)

China's ban on wild animal consumption has affected the jobs of a quarter of a million people since it took effect earlier this year in the wake of the country's coronavirus outbreak, a new report has found.

The rules, which forbid the sale and consumption of species both from the wild and bred in captivity, including snakes, porcupines and bamboo rats, have left businesses unable to sell animals worth 11 billion yuan ($1.58 billion) and scotched infrastructure investment worth 7.4 billion yuan, according to a report published Monday by a legal watchdog affiliated with the national legislature.

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