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Asia allies need to adapt to US Navy's nimbler, unmanned future

Japan, South Korea and Australia must review their weapons and operations

The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt operates in the Philippine Sea on May 21, following an extended visit to Guam in the midst of the COVID-19 global pandemic. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Navy)

TOKYO -- The coronavirus pandemic has laid bare the need for change in the operation of the world's navies, as infections in the crowded, small quarters of ships surge.

Not only are crew members expected to work in small, unventilated spaces, they are also kept together over months, exposing them to each other's germs. The U.S. Navy reported more than 2,000 active infections in its ranks as of the end of May, accounting for roughly 40% of cases in the military.

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