ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintIcon Twitter
Coronavirus

Japan receives 2nd shipment of Pfizer vaccine

The government says 5,039 people inoculated as of Friday

A plane arrives at Narita airport carrying Pfizer Inc.'s COVID-19 vaccine, Feb. 21. (Photo by Yo Inoue)

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Japan received its second shipment of Pfizer Inc.'s COVID-19 vaccine on Sunday as it continues inoculating an initial group of health workers in the first phase of its vaccination rollout.

The shipment of up to around 450,000 doses of the first vaccine against the novel coronavirus that Japan has approved for use arrived at Narita airport near Tokyo after the European Union gave the green light under its new vaccine export controls.

Japan, which received its first shipment of up to 386,100 doses from Pfizer's factory in Belgium on Feb. 12, launched its vaccination program on Wednesday for 40,000 health care workers, starting first in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said 5,039 people had been inoculated at 68 medical facilities as of Friday.

The government said Saturday it had received reports of hives and chills as possible side effects of the vaccine developed by Pfizer of the United States and Germany's BioNTech SE.

But there have been no reports of severe allergic reactions, also known as anaphylaxis, or deaths after shots were administered.

Of the 40,000 health care workers, 20,000 are taking part in a study to track potential side effects caused by the vaccine, keeping daily records for seven weeks after receiving the first of two shots. The shots will be administered three weeks apart.

The next group in line to be vaccinated from March is an estimated 4.7 million other front-line health care workers across the country.

People aged 65 or older, a group of about 36 million, will begin being inoculated from April, followed by people with preexisting conditions and those working at elderly care facilities, then finally the general population, according to the schedule set by the health ministry.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more