ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
Coronavirus

Japanese coronavirus test for business travelers costs $370

'Proof of no infection' certificates can be produced quickly for busy people

Shimadzu's saliva test can yield results in as little as an hour. (Photo by Kenya Akama)

KYOTO -- Japanese precision instruments maker Shimadzu begins conducting coronavirus tests Tuesday for people who need proof of negative results to travel overseas, as countries reopen their doors to foreign travelers.

The company will check saliva samples collected by a Kyoto clinic and sent to specialized facilities. The polymerase chain reaction test can be completed in as little as an hour, and patients who have a sample submitted by 11 a.m. can receive their results that evening. Shimadzu says it can process up to 150 tests daily.

Because testing in the absence of symptoms is not covered by Japan's national insurance, such individuals will need to pay about 40,000 yen ($373) per test.

Shimadzu started handling coronavirus tests under public insurance in early June after receiving the green light from the Kyoto municipal government. With infections in Japan down from their peak, the company looks to use its spare capacity to meet growing demand from travelers.

Proof of a negative COVID-19 test is required by many countries that have recently begun relaxing travel bans, such as Vietnam. Major companies that specialize in testing reportedly now handle coronavirus screening on a private basis.

PCR testing requires specialized equipment and trained medical professionals to interpret the results. A medical institution is needed to issue certificates proving virus-free status for patients.

Besides demand for international travel, some businesses also seek to have employees screened to facilitate domestic trips, a Nikkei survey found. Rising demand for coronavirus tests means that lowering barriers such as cost and red tape will become increasingly important.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 1 month for $0.99

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends October 31st

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to Nikkei Asia has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media

Nikkei Asian Review, now known as Nikkei Asia, will be the voice of the Asian Century.

Celebrate our next chapter
Free access for everyone - Sep. 30

Find out more