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Huawei crackdown

Trump calls Huawei 'dangerous' but open to including in trade deal

President predicts swift deal with Beijing

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at an event announcing a farm aid program at the White House on May 23. Trump called Huawei "very dangerous" but also held out the possibility of incorporating it into a trade deal with China.   © Reuters

NEW YORK -- American complaints against Chinese telecommunications equipment maker Huawei Technologies could be resolved as part of a broader trade deal with China, U.S. President Donald Trump said Thursday.

"Huawei is something that's very dangerous" from security and military standpoints, Trump said in a news conference at the White House.

But he also said that "I could imagine Huawei being possibly included in some form of, or some part of, a trade deal."

Trump did not elaborate on how such a deal will be constructed but said it would "look very good for us."

The American leader said he will meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Group of 20 summit in Japan next month, hinting that the trade war may end soon.

"I think things probably are going to happen with China fast because I can't imagine that they can be thrilled" with thousands of companies leaving their shores for elsewhere, Trump said.

The U.S. has put Huawei on the Commerce Department's Entity List, which restricts exports of products incorporating U.S. technology, such as chips and crucial materials that Huawei would need for its new products.

Earlier this week, the Commerce Department eased restrictions on Huawei. The department issued a 90-day "temporary general license" that allows sales and services provided to Huawei and affiliates to support existing Huawei handsets as well as existing networks and equipment.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Lu Kang said Thursday that the U.S. must come with sincerity if it wants to continue with talks. Lu did not mention any scheduled talks or meetings with American negotiators.

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