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Huawei crackdown

US said to be in talks over legal deal with Huawei's Meng

Executive could return to China if she admits wrongdoing

Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is battling extradition to the U.S. to face bank fraud and other charges related to alleged violations of sanctions against Iran.   © Reuters

NEW YORK -- Lawyers for Huawei Technologies' chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou have spoken to officials from the U.S. Department of Justice about allowing her to return to China if she admits wrongdoing in a criminal case against her, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The two sides are reportedly discussing a "deferred prosecution agreement," which would require Meng to admit to some of the allegations brought against her, but the prosecutors would reportedly agree to possibly defer and drop the charges if Meng co-operated.

Meng, who is under house arrest in Vancouver, Canada, has resisted the proposed deal so far because she believes she has done nothing wrong, according to the Journal's report.

Huawei declined to comment. The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Meng's extradition case passed the two-year mark last week. She was arrested at the international airport in Vancouver in December 2018 over fraud and conspiracy charges.

The case has been at the center of the U.S. crackdown on Huawei, China's most high-profile technology company. The Trump administration has ramped up efforts to restrict Huawei's activities, alleging that the company is a threat to U.S. national security because of its ties to the Chinese military. Huawei denies it poses any threat.

The U.S. Department of Justice alleged that Meng -- the daughter of Huawei's founder -- falsely denied Huawei's relationship with Iranian company Skycom Tech to HSBC. Prosecutors alleged that Meng's "misrepresentation" led HSBC to continue its business with Huawei, risking civil liability and criminal penalties, such as violating U.S. sanctions on Iran.

Meng has been contesting extradition at the British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver. Meng's lawyers alleged that Canadian officials committed violations during her arrest, which could potentially lead to her extradition case being dropped if she won.

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