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Myanmar Crisis

Suu Kyi supporters urge governments not to recognize Myanmar junta

NLD members set up committee and appoint acting ministers

Buddhist monks show their support for the CRPH, or the Committee of Representatives to the Union Parliament, which is made up mainly of members of the Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy.   © AP

BANGKOK -- Supporters of Myanmar's elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi are appealing to foreign governments not to recognize the military junta that ousted her in a coup last month.

The Committee of Representatives to the Union Parliament (CRPH), made up mainly of members of the Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy, on Tuesday appointed nine acting ministers, including foreign minister. It is believed that the NLD is setting up a provisional government until the return of Suu Kyi, who was put under house arrest by the military.

After the military seized power in the Feb. 1 coup, it established the State Administration Council, the highest decision-making body, and appointed ministers including foreign minister. Suu Kyi was the foreign minister as well as de facto head of government in her position as State Counselor. The CRPH is countering the military's efforts to tighten its grip on power by appointing its own ministers.

A number of foreign administrations have urged the country to restore democracy so far.

U.N. Ambassador Kyaw Moe Tun, who was sacked by the military, on Monday wrote to the U.N. General Assembly president to say that he was still the legitimate representative for Myanmar. He expressed support for the CRPH at the UN. On Tuesday, U.S. State Department spokesperson Ned Price declared the ambassador's dismissal as being unlawful.

The military is continuing to pressure NLD. Suu Kyi's lawyer said Wednesday that President Win Myint has been additionally charged with two offenses including anti-constitutional acts.

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