ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
N Korea at crossroads

North Korea ready to meet with US in late Sept

Willing to discuss 'comprehensive' issues, says First Vice Foreign Minister

North Korea First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui said that the United States must come to the negotiating table with proposals that satisfy North Korea, or dealings between the two countries will come to an end.   © AP

PYONGYANG (Kyodo) -- North Korea is ready to hold talks with the United States in late September, a senior diplomat said Monday, indicating that stalled denuclearization talks between the two nations may move forward.

Pyongyang is willing to discuss "comprehensive" issues with the United States, First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui said in a statement carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency, adding the time and place will be "agreed" later.

Choe, regarded as a close aide to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, said, "I believe that the U.S. side will come out with a proposal geared to the interests of the DPRK and the U.S. and based on the calculation method acceptable to us."

DPRK is the acronym for North Korea's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"If the U.S. side fingers again the worn-out scenario which has nothing to do with the new calculation method at the DPRK-U.S. working negotiation to be held with so much effort, the DPRK-U.S. dealings may come to an end," she added.

At their June 30 meeting in the inter-Korean truce village of Panmunjeom, Kim agreed with U.S. President Donald Trump that the two countries would resume stalled negotiations within weeks, but such talks have yet to be held.

Instead, North Korea has continued to test its weapons technology in recent months. Late last month, it fired two projectiles believed to be short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan -- Pyongyang's seventh round of launches since late July.

At their Feb. 27-28 summit in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi, Kim and Trump fell short of bridging the gap between Washington's denuclearization demands and Pyongyang's calls for sanctions relief.

In a speech to the nation's legislature in April, Kim asked the United States to shift its policy on denuclearization negotiations by the end of this year, lambasting Washington for making what he claimed are one-sided demands.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said earlier this week, "We are hopeful that in the coming days or perhaps weeks we'll be back at the negotiating table with them. That's the best outcome."

Technically, Washington and Pyongyang remain in a state of war as the 1950-1953 Korean War ended in a cease-fire. The two countries have no diplomatic relations.

 

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends April 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media