ArrowArtboardCreated with Sketch.Title ChevronTitle ChevronEye IconIcon FacebookIcon LinkedinIcon Mail ContactPath LayerIcon MailPositive ArrowIcon PrintSite TitleTitle ChevronIcon Twitter
N Korea at crossroads

Trump received 'nice note' from North Korean leader Kim

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom, South Korea, on June 30, 2019.   © Reuters

WASHINGTON (Kyodo) -- U.S. President Donald Trump said Saturday that he recently received a "nice note" from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, while shrugging off concerns over the country's continued test-firing of short-range missiles.

"I see they're testing short-range missiles. And, you know, they've been doing it a long time," Trump said at a press conference at the White House, adding, "I received a nice note from him recently...I think we're doing fine."

Trump sent a personal letter to the North Korean leader, both countries said in late March. The latest communication received by Trump could be a reply from Kim, although the U.S. president did not explain its contents nor exactly when he received it.

The latest exchanges between the two leaders come at a time when negotiations to denuclearize North Korea remain stalled.

Trump also criticized claims that he has made concessions to North Korea, insisting at the press conference that he has "actually increased the sanctions" against the country.

But he said he has maintained amicable ties with Kim and that it is "not a bad thing to have a good relationship."

"Look, if I wasn't elected, you would, right now, be at war with North Korea," Trump claimed.

Trump met the North Korean leader three times through June 2019. At the first-ever U.S.-North Korea summit in June 2018 in Singapore, Trump promised to provide security guarantees to Pyongyang in return for "complete" denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

But talks have since brought little progress, with the two countries at odds over issues such as how much sanctions relief should be extended to Pyongyang in return for denuclearization steps. In the meantime, North Korea has continued testing weapons.

Sponsored Content

About Sponsored Content This content was commissioned by Nikkei's Global Business Bureau.

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this monthThis is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia;
the most dynamic market in the world.

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia

Get trusted insights from experts within Asia itself.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Get Unlimited access

You have {{numberArticlesLeft}} free article{{numberArticlesLeft-plural}} left this month

This is your last free article this month

Stay ahead with our exclusives on Asia; the most
dynamic market in the world
.

Get trusted insights from experts
within Asia itself.

Try 3 months for $9

Offer ends April 30th

Your trial period has expired

You need a subscription to...

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers and subscribe

Your full access to the Nikkei Asian Review has expired

You need a subscription to:

  • Read all stories with unlimited access
  • Use our mobile and tablet apps
See all offers
NAR on print phone, device, and tablet media