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Immigrants are a common sight on the streets of Flushing, New York, a thriving ethnic neighborhood where approximately 70% of the population is Asian. (Photo by Shino Yanagawa)
The Big Story

Trump's anti-immigrant message hits home for Asians

Visa crackdown is turning the American dream into a nightmare of uncertainty

HIROYUKI NISHIMURA, Nikkei deputy editor | China

NEW YORK/LOS ANGELES/DETROIT -- For Jan, the night of Nov. 8 last year was terrifying. The 20-year-old Mindanao-born Filipino had gathered with several of his undocumented peers in Flushing, New York, to watch the votes being counted for the U.S. presidential election. When it became certain that Donald Trump would win, the atmosphere of despair in the room was palpable.

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